Guess What? Someone Ordered an iPhone 15 Pro Max and Got an Android Instead.

Oh, I almost forgot to mention that he ordered from Apple, so something fishy is definitely going on here.

Sam Writes Security

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Photo by Tyler Lastovich on Unsplash

If you’re thinking that the above photo isn’t of an iPhone 15 Pro Max, maybe I received the wrong photo because the 15 Pro Max is what I asked for; the difference is that my source isn’t Apple.

A bizarre delivery mishap happened recently in the UK, where a customer ordered an iPhone 15 Pro Max from Apple’s official website and instead received a fake lookalike that was actually an Android device. The individual shed light on a problematic issue by sharing their unexpected event on Reddit.
When the supposed flagship iPhone was shown, concerns surfaced, even though all of Apple’s regular delivery confirmation emails and tracking data from the delivery partner, Dynamic Parcel Distribution, were confirmed.

The buyer assumed it was a returned phone from Apple after observing a pre-installed screen protector. However, following closer inspection, concerns arose and well it was an Android device with an Apple logo on the back.

Upon activation, the flaws became clear: the screen did not align with the OLED display, displaying erratic lighting, and an odd bottom structure revealed it was not an actual iPhone.
The inept setup process verified suspicions even further by displaying an Android smartphone masquerading as an iPhone 15 Pro Max. Pre-installed apps such as TikTok, Facebook, and YouTube gave weight to the proof of a forgery.

Fortunately, the customer avoided setting up anything that would lead to their Apple accounts and wallets, who knows how far this would go?

Given Apple’s reputation for safe delivery, it is highly unusual to receive a fake iPhone straight from the company. This incident shows a security lapse that occurred between Apple’s dispatch and the recipient’s delivery of the package.
The customer contacted Apple, and the company promised to look into the matter. This highlights the need for caution and acts as a reminder to always carefully inspect new packages . Below are some of the images shared.

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Sam Writes Security

Freelance writer. Linux & cybersecurity enthusiast. Welcome to my world!